Turtle News/Archive003

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Turtle News/Archive003


Turtle News


Turtle film set to become Hollywood blockbuster

2009.02.27 - telegraph.co.uk

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The story behind Turtle: The Incredible Journey, a film tracking the journey of a loggerhead turtle as she travels across the Atlantic Ocean and narrated by twice Oscar-nominated actress Miranda Richardson.

Yay! Queenie's back!

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byeee...

Shell shocker: The baby turtle born with two-heads can eat Chinese food faster

Two heads means we can eat faster! Source: dailymail.co.uk
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Two heads means we can eat faster! Source: dailymail.co.uk

2008.09.13 - Water World aquatic farm at Wuwei town in Anhui, eastern China

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The Chinese decided to get in on the two-headed turtle action that's been going around lately. This one has been getting a bit of attention on the net this week. And no, it really isn't that small, those are just the giant prop hands they use in CSI for closeup camera shots. Fine, don't believe me. I don't believe me either, so that makes two of us. Innneeecuuuuute!

It is the baby turtle that proves two heads really are better than one.
While its siblings grow at a the usual steady pace, this tiny creature is speeding ahead.
The reason for its extraordinary growth spurt is simple: having two heads mean it eats twice as fast.

(Be sure to check the link for more pictures.)

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Fossil of Ancient Pregnant Turtle Discovered

Features of the five crushed eggs discovered inside the fossil turtle's body cavity suggested the female turtle would have laid them in a matter of days. Credit: Darla Zelenitsky, University of Calgary.
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Features of the five crushed eggs discovered inside the fossil turtle's body cavity suggested the female turtle would have laid them in a matter of days. Credit: Darla Zelenitsky, University of Calgary.

2008.08.27 - Canada

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A turtle that toddled alongside the dinosaurs died just days before laying a clutch of eggs.
Scientists from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Canada discovered the turtle in 1999 in a mud-filled channel in the badlands of southeastern Alberta. Then, in 2005, University of Calgary scientists found a nest of 26 eggs laid by another female of the same species in the same region.
The pregnant turtle represents the first fossil turtle to be unearthed with eggs still inside the body cavity, the scientists say.

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